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Understanding the iliotibial band

For many people, it's the source of a nagging—and painful—injury, but for Carolyn Eng, the IT band is an intriguing mystery, one she may be close to solving.

dateAug 27, 2015 in Other
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The emerging science of human screams

Our noisy world is no match for a screaming infant. An airplane could be flying by as a house party rages on downstairs while a literal cat fight takes place outside, and still a wailing baby will win your attention. One ...

dateJul 16, 2015 in Other
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Access to electricity is linked to reduced sleep

Blame smartphone alerts, constant connectivity and a deluge of media for our society's sleep deprivation. But the root cause of why we get less sleep now than our ancestors did could come down to a much simpler reason: artificial ...

dateJun 19, 2015 in Other
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Genetic markers for fetal overgrowth syndrome discovered

Humans and cattle share a similar epigenetic fetal overgrowth disorder that occurs more commonly following assisted reproduction procedures. In humans, this disorder is called Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), and in cattle ...

dateApr 28, 2015 in Other
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Researchers can trace dust samples using fungal DNA

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Colorado, Boulder, have developed a statistical model that allows them to tell where a dust sample came from within the continental United States based ...

dateApr 15, 2015 in Other
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Who's going to win? The answer could change by the hour

The outcome of that big sporting event you just can't wait to watch may depend on how the timing of the match aligns (or doesn't) with the internal biological clocks of the athletes on the teams, according to a study reported ...

dateJan 29, 2015 in Other
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Sun may determine lifespan at birth, study finds

Could the Sun be your lucky—or unlucky—star? In an unusual study published Wednesday, Norwegian scientists said people born during periods of solar calm may live longer, as much as five years on average, than those who ...

dateJan 07, 2015 in Other
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The human eye can see 'invisible' infrared light

Any science textbook will tell you we can't see infrared light. Like X-rays and radio waves, infrared light waves are outside the visual spectrum. But an international team of researchers co-led by scientists at Washington ...

dateDec 01, 2014 in Other
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New feather findings get scientists in a flap

Scientists from the University of Southampton have revealed that feather shafts are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material, much like carbon fibre, which allows the feather to bend and twist to cope with the stresses ...

Arm swinging reduces the metabolic cost of running

Have you ever tried running without swinging your arms? It's not easy. Each step jars and it feels like hard work: but is it? Christopher Arellano, from Brown University, USA, says, 'We know from the literature that arm swinging ...

Odor suppression causes bad wine smell

(Phys.org) —A bad, musty smell sometimes ruins a bottle of corked wine. Since the 1990s, researchers have known that this unpleasant odor comes from the chemical 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), which forms when a fungus that ...

You can't teach speed: sprinters break 10-year rule

New research shows world-class sprinters are born, not created. Grand Valley State University researchers found that exceptional speed prior to formal training is a prerequisite for becoming a world-class sprinter. The findings ...

Berlin start-up pioneers fish-farm veggie garden

The ancient Aztecs and Chinese did it millenia ago, and now a Berlin start-up hopes it will feed 21st-century city dwellers using aquaponics, a combination of rearing fish and growing vegetables.

The ethics of resurrecting extinct species

(Phys.org) —At some point, scientists may be able to bring back extinct animals, and perhaps early humans, raising questions of ethics and environmental disruption.

Humans have a nose for gender

The human body produces chemical cues that communicate gender to members of the opposite sex, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 1. Whiffs of the active steroid ...

Free will is an illusion, biologist says

(PhysOrg.com) -- When biologist Anthony Cashmore claims that the concept of free will is an illusion, he's not breaking any new ground. At least as far back as the ancient Greeks, people have wondered how humans seem to have ...

DNA testing solves mystery of Titanic survivor claim
A complex logic circuit made from bacterial genes
Dutch vegetarian butcher takes on the 'Frankenburger'
Researchers devise a new way to plot circadian clock
In baseball, bigger still better
This is what a fish thought looks like
More possible branches to the domain of life
Science gets a grip on finger wrinkles
Disease burden links ecology to economic growth
DNA sleuth hunts wine roots in Anatolia

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