Archive: 12/6/2005

Computer simulation shows buckyballs deform DNA

Soccer-ball-shaped "buckyballs" are the most famous players on the nanoscale field, presenting tantalizing prospects of revolutionizing medicine and the computer industry. Since their discovery in 1985, engineers ...

Dec 06, 2005
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Samsung chases Middle East wireless market

Samsung unveiled its latest entrant in the Saudi cell-phone sector this week as it continued its aggressive pursuit of market share in the Middle East.

Dec 06, 2005
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Earthquake 'Pulses' Could Predict Tsunami Impact

The magnitude 9.2 earthquake that triggered a devastating tsunami in the Indian Ocean in December of 2004 originated just off the coast of northern Sumatra, but an "energy pulse" – an area where slip on the fault was much ...

Dec 06, 2005
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Boeing A160 Hummingbird Completes Flight Test

Boeing has announced the A160 Hummingbird unmanned rotorcraft made its first test flight from an airfield near Victorville, Calif., Nov. 30. "This flight - the first with a six cylinder Subaru engine - is an ...

Dec 06, 2005
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Nano World: New aimed nanoparticles

A new method to develop collections of nanoparticles that each seek out different cell types could help scientists to better spot tumors before they grow or to deliver medicines to precise targets, experts told ...

Dec 06, 2005
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Kazakhstan Predicts Major Developments For Its Space Program

Kazakhstan's Prime Minister, Danial Akhmetov, during a visit to the Energia Rocket and Space Corporation at Korolev near Moscow last week, announced that the Republic will further its plans within its Space Industry Development ...

Dec 06, 2005
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Munich scientists study bystander effect

A Munich, Germany, study indicates the larger the group watching someone in trouble in a public place, the less likely anyone will offer to help.

Dec 06, 2005
3.3 / 5 (24) 0

Study: Arctic soil carbon underestimated

University of Washington researchers say scientists studying climate warming might be underestimating the amount of soil carbon in the high Arctic.

Dec 06, 2005
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